War is not Glamorous

I was saddened when I recently read in the San Diego Union Tribune the following headline: US Soldier Kills 16 Afghan Civilians.

Isn’t it ironic that a few days ago (March 16th) marked the 44th anniversary of the My Lai massacre? On that infamous day, a group of American soldiers systematically killed 500 innocent, Vietnamese women, children and infants in the tiny village of My Lai. Read more...

The Impossible Mission

The recent incident of an alleged US soldier murdering 16 Afghan civilians and the burning of some of their corpses, including those of children, in addition to instances of Quran burning and Marines urinating on corpses of insurgents solidified my view that the US troops on the ground will not be able to “win over the hearts and minds” of the Afghan civilians.I think that the vast majority of US troops at all levels of command make a sincere conscientious effort to follow this mission; nevertheless, the latest array of incidents clearly suggests the systemic problem in achieving this goal. Since the success of the military mission is contingent upon the currently adopted strategy of winning the hearts and minds of Afghan civilians, my last hopes of the US military’s ability to stabilize the country and to reduce the civilians’ support for the Taliban, have evaporated. Read more...

Jack Doxey’s Letter to the Editor in SD Union Tribune

War Not Glamorous

I was saddened when I read “U.S. soldier kills 16 Afghan civilians” (March 12).

Isn’t it ironic that Friday, March 16, marks the 44th anniversary of the My Lai massacre? On that infamous day, a group of American soldiers systematically murdered 500 innocent, Vietnamese women, children and infants in the tiny village of My Lai. The same dialogue and excuses were given at that time. Read more...